Is Fugitive from Justice a Felony

If you or someone you know is facing a criminal charge and is on the run, you may have heard the term “fugitive from justice.” But what exactly does it mean, and what are the legal consequences of being a fugitive? This article will explore what it means to be a fugitive from justice and whether it is considered a felony offense.

Is Fugitive from Justice a Felony?

Understanding the Concept of Fugitive from Justice

A fugitive is someone who has a warrant or ran away while waiting for trial, sentencing, or jail time. In other words, someone has violated the terms of their release from custody and is currently evading law enforcement officials. Fugitives from justice are sometimes called “absconders” or “escapees.”

The Legal Consequences of Being a Fugitive from Justice

Fleeing from justice can have serious legal consequences, including possibly being charged with a felony offense. In many states, it is a crime to knowingly and willfully evade arrest, trial, or imprisonment. In some cases, the offense may be classified as a misdemeanor, while in others, it may be considered a felony.

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The severity of the offense and the resulting penalties will depend on the case’s specific circumstances, including the severity of the underlying charges and the length of time the person has been on the run. In addition to facing criminal charges, fugitives from justice may also be subject to civil penalties, such as the forfeiture of bail or other collateral. They may face difficulties securing future bail or other forms of pretrial release.

Felony Charges for Fugitives from Justice

In some states, being a fugitive from justice is considered a felony offense. For example, in California, a person who is willfully and knowingly in flight from the law is guilty of a felony. The offense is punishable by up to three years in state prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

In Texas, running away after a lawful arrest for a serious crime is “escape” and can result in charges. Escape is a third-degree felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000.

What to Do if You Are a Fugitive from Justice

If you are currently on the run, have an outstanding arrest warrant, or have fled from custody, the best course of action is to turn yourself in to the authorities. While it may be tempting to continue evading law enforcement officials, doing so will only worsen your situation and increase your penalties.

By turning yourself in, you may be able to negotiate a plea deal or other form of leniency with the prosecution, especially if you have mitigating circumstances or are willing to cooperate with law enforcement officials. It is also important to remember that the longer you remain a fugitive from justice, the more difficult it may be to secure a favorable outcome in your case.

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Conclusion

To sum up, running away from the law can get you into trouble like being accused of a serious crime. While the specific penalties will depend on the circumstances of the case, fleeing from justice is never a good idea and can make your situation worse. If you or someone you know is currently on the run, the best action is to turn yourself in to the authorities and seek legal counsel.

FAQs

Is being a fugitive from justice a felony offense in all states?

No, the severity of the offense and the resulting penalties will depend on the specific laws in each state.

What should I do if I have an outstanding arrest warrant or fled custody?

The best action is to turn yourself into the authorities and seek legal counsel. Evading law enforcement officials will only make your situation worse.

Can I negotiate a plea deal if I turn myself in?

You could negotiate with the prosecutor for a deal or leniency, depending on your circumstances.

What are the possible penalties for being a fugitive from justice?

The punishment for running from the law hinges on how bad the crime was and how long you’ve been hiding.

Will I face civil penalties in addition to criminal charges?

Yes, fugitives from justice may also be subject to civil penalties, such as the forfeiture of bail or other collateral.

It is important to remember that being a fugitive from justice is a serious offense with far-reaching consequences. If you or someone you know is running from the law, it’s best to surrender and find a lawyer. Confess and cooperate to reduce punishment and improve outcomes with the cops.

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